Publications

Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

The Institute for the Study and Human Rights and the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race are pleased to announce the new publication &ldquoWalking and Learning with Indigenous Peoples: A Contribution to the 5th Anniversary of the International Summer Program on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Policy at Columbia University”.

Edited by Pamela Calla and Elsa Stamatopoulou, the book is available via Columbia’s Academic Commons.

The book has been conceptualized to bring out the relevance of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples through an analysis of various thematic and geographical areas and case studies. It is written by alumni of the international Summer Program on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Policy that has been held at Columbia from 2013-2017. 

Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Saturday, April 21, 2018

The international symposium was organized and co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights (Indigenous Peoples' Rights Program) and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society in collaboration with UNESCO, the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Permanent Mission of Ecuador to the United Nations. Some 80 people from all regions participated in the Symposium which was held to support the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages. The Outcome Summary Document of the Symposium identifies challenges and good practices and make a number of recommendations to a variety of actors for future work in this area.

Institute for the Study for Human Rights
Sunday, December 3, 2017
Saturday, April 25, 2015

The concept note and program for the seminar ”The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples: Outcomes in Contexts” held April 25-26, 2015 at Columbia University, New York.

The conference was co-sponsored by The Sami and Indigenous Rights Group at the Arctic University of Norway, UiT as well as the following Columbia University institutes: The Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, The Institute for the Study of Human Rights, and The University Seminar on Indigenous Studies.

Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Access to justice is a demand that increasingly underlies the major debates of our time, whether in the area of economic, political and social development, peace, human rights or culture. The issue is a bridge between the past, the present and the future as it refers to the entrenched marginalization of and systemic discrimination against members or groups of society. Access to justice is the stepping stone to address or remedy injustice. No area of human endeavor has given more meaning and normative content to the concept of access to justice than the human rights area, including the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. It is within this rich human rights context that the effort to breathe new life to the struggle of Indigenous Peoples’ access to justice should be viewed. The mobilization around access to justice is shedding light on the concrete steps that can be followed for Indigenous Peoples’ access to justice to materialize.